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Background

Early Life in Wisconsin
Rosalie Mislove was born in 1923, one of ten children/the seventh daughter of a seventh son . Being part of such a large family was rewarding and loving where everyone helped each other yet found ways to be independent. Her mother was widowed when she was nine years old. The family moved to Milwaukee, Wisconsin where all the kids pitched in to help the family stay alive. Before going to Milwaukee, she attended rural public schools always drawing and sketching. After she moved to Milwaukee, Rosalie found a way to attend the Layton Art College at only 14 through an arrangement when they saw how talented she was. At 16, she was part of a five woman experience unusual for 1the 1930's and 40's. They formed a "company:, purchased an old car, and toured traveling circuses and county fairs sketching "Profile Portraits."

Rosalie graduated from Riverside High School and Layton Art School. She also took classes at Marquette University, Milwaukee State Teachers College, University of wisconsisn Extension, Milwaukee Art Institute, Chicago Art Institute, and studied indepenetently under many artists including Joseph Freibert and Jack Perlmutter. She exhibited her sketches and paintings and won awards. Rosalie also helped to publish and write copy in a literary art/poetry/music magazine.

Marriage and off to Washington D.C
In 1946, Rosalie fell in love and married Erwin Ritz in a double wedding with her older sister, Cele. Cele and her husband, Allen, moved to Pittsburgh, PA and Rosalie and Erwin started their new life together in Washington D.C. in a small apartment. It wasn't long before 4 daughters were born: Barbara, Sandra, Terry, and Janet. Even with her new life as wife and mother, Rosalie continued to work as an artist. She illustrated and wrote children's books, magazine articles, provided cartoons for publications. Rosalie even covered Senate and House hearings working as a freelance artist for the Washington Post, AP, and WTOP-TV. She helped form the Georgetown Artists' Coop where she exhitbited her art and taught art classes. There were times